Thursday, June 9, 2016

Milkweeds in the Florida scrub

Found a beautiful Curtiss' Milkweed on the land next to our house today. Asclepias curtissii is endangered so we are very happy to have it growing there. It is also endemic, meaning it only grows in Florida. I will keep an eye on it to see if any monarch or queen butterflies are living there!


Curtiss' Milkweed living in Florida scrub

Asclepias curtissii - you can see a smaller one growing to the right of it

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

Author Skype Visits

Visiting Olivia Brophie fans in New York

Olivia Brophie fans in Queensland

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

A local librarian sent me this photo because it reminded her of the Olivia Brophie Series. It looks like Olivia and her bear-friend Hoolie are walking together.

Bear tracks in the Florida scrub

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Winter and Palmettos in the Florida Scrub

We had our yearly frost last night and it left these beautiful patterns on the palmetto fronds. It would be interesting to investigate why this happens. Why this pattern? I enjoyed the view for a few brief minutes in the morning before the sun worked its magic.





Wintertime Palmettos

Friday, January 8, 2016

Florida Children's Author Visits

Everyone knows I love to visit classrooms that are reading Olivia Brophie books! I recently visited a class in California via Skype and had a great time as always. Sometimes teachers send me photos from their side of the conversation. In this particular case, I discovered the classroom itself was overrun with frogs, something I couldn't see from my video.
Skype visit with frog-loving classroom



Meeting Moki from Sky Island for the first time


Anyway, the class is only on chapter 4 of Pearl of Tagelus, so they have sooooo many adventures ahead of them!

Monday, November 9, 2015

 
The cassia trees are blooming now in central Florida. This one is in our backyard. What you can't see in the photo are the cloudless sulphur butterflies flying all around it. They are the exact same color of yellow and they are busy laying eggs on the leaves for the next generation of sulphurs.